All of NicholasKees's Comments + Replies

I agree that this is important. Are you more concerned about cyborgs than other human-in-the-loop systems? To me the whole point is figuring out how to make systems where the human remains fully in control (unlike, e.g. delegating to agents), and so answering this "how to say whether a person retains control" question seems critical to doing that successfully.

2David Scott Krueger1y
Indeed.  I think having a clean, well-understood interface for human/AI interaction seems useful here.  I recognize this is a big ask in the current norms and rules around AI development and deployment.

GI is very efficient, if you consider that you can reuse a lot machinery that you learn, rather than needing to relearn it over and over again. https://towardsdatascience.com/what-is-better-one-general-model-or-many-specialized-models-9500d9f8751d 

1Linda Linsefors1y
Second reply. And this time I actually read the link. I'm not suppressed by that result. My original comment was a reaction to claims of the type [the best way to solve almost any task is to develop general intelligence, therefore there is a strong selection pressure to become generally intelligent]. I think this is wrong, but I have not yet figured out exactly what the correct view is.  But to use an analogy, it's something like this: In the example you gave, the AI get's better at the sub tasks by learning on a more general training set. It seems like general capabilities was useful. But consider that we just trained on even more data for a singel sub task, then wouldn't it develop general capabilities, since we just noticed that general capabilities was useful for that sub task. I was planing to say "no" but I notice that I do expect some transfer learning. I.e. if you train on just one of the dataset, I expect it to be bad at the other ones, but I also expect it to learn them quicker than without any pre-training.  I seem to expect that AI will develop general capabilities when training on rich enough data, i.e. almost any real world data. LLM is a central example of this.  I think my disagreement with at least my self from some years ago and probably some other people too (but I've been away a bit form the discourse so I'm not sure), is that I don't expect as much agentic long term planing as I used to expect. 
1Linda Linsefors1y
I agree that eventually, at some level of trying to solve enough different types of tasks, GI will be efficient, in terms of how much machinery you need, but it will never be able to compete on speed.  Also, it's an open question what is "enough different types of tasks". Obviously, for a sufficient broad class of problems GI will be more efficient (in the sense clarified above). Equally obviously, for a sufficient narrow class of problems narrow capabilities will be more efficient.  Humans have GI to some extent, but we mostly don't use it. This is interesting. This means that a typical human environment is complex enough so that it's worth carrying around the hardware for GI. But even though we have it, it is evolutionary better to fall back at habits, or imitation, or instinkt, for most situations. Looking back to exactly what I wrote, I said there will not be any selection pressure for GI as long as other options are available. I'm not super confident in this. But if I'm going to defend it here anyway by pointing out that "as long as other options are available", is doing a lot of the work here. Some problems are only solvable by noticing deep patterns in reality, and in this case a sufficiently deep NN with sufficient training will learn this, and that is GI.

and increasing the number of actors can make collusive cooperation more difficult

An empirical counterargument to this is in the incentives human leaders face when overseeing people who might coordinate against them. When authoritarian leaders come into power they will actively purge members from their inner circles in order to keep them small. The larger the inner circle, the harder it becomes to prevent a rebellious individual from gathering the critical mass needed for a full blown coup. 

Source: The Dictator's Handbook by Bruce Bueno de Mesquita and... (read more)

1Eric Drexler1y
Are you arguing that increasing the number of (AI) actors cannot make collusive cooperation more difficult? Even in the human case, defectors make large conspiracies more difficult, and in the non-human case, intentional diversity can almost guarantee failures of AI-to-AI alignment.