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Solve Corrigibility Week

Availability: Almost all times between 10 AM and PM, California time, regardless of day. Highly flexible hours. Text over voice is preferred, I'm easiest to reach on Discord. The LW Walled Garden can also be nice.

Troll Bridge

A note to clarify for confused readers of the proof. We started out by assuming , and . We conclude  by how the agent works. But the step from there to  (ie, inconsistency of PA) isn't entirely spelled out in this post.

Pretty much, that follows from a proof by contradiction. Assume con(PA) ie , and it happens to be a con(PA) theorem that the agent can't prove in advance what it will do, ie, . (I can spell this out in more detail if anyone wants) However, combining  and  (or the other option) gets you , which, along with , gets you . So PA isn't consistent, ie, .

Finite Factored Sets: Polynomials and Probability

In the proof of Lemma 3, it should be 

"Finally, since , we have that .

Thus,  and  are both equal to .

instead.

Yet More Modal Combat

Any idea of how well this would generalize to stuff like Chicken or games with more than 2-players, 2-moves?

Introduction To The Infra-Bayesianism Sequence

I don't know, we're hunting for it, relaxations of dynamic consistency would be extremely interesting if found, and I'll let you know if we turn up with anything nifty.

The Many Faces of Infra-Beliefs

Looks good. 

Re: the dispute over normal bayesianism: For me, "environment" denotes "thingy that can freely interact with any policy in order to produce a probability distribution over histories". This is a different type signature than a probability distribution over histories, which doesn't have a degree of freedom corresponding to which policy you pick.

But for infra-bayes, we can associate a classical environment with the set of probability distributions over histories (for various possible choices of policy), and then the two distinct notions become the same sort of thing (set of probability distributions over histories, some of which can be made to be inconsistent by how you act), so you can compare them.

The Many Faces of Infra-Beliefs

I'd say this is mostly accurate, but I'd amend number 3. There's still a sort of non-causal influence going on in pseudocausal problems, you can easily formalize counterfactual mugging and XOR blackmail as pseudocausal problems (you need acausal specifically for transparent newcomb, not vanilla newcomb). But it's specifically a sort of influence that's like "reality will adjust itself so contradictions don't happen, and there may be correlations between what happened in the past, or other branches, and what your action is now, so you can exploit this by acting to make bad outcomes inconsistent". It's purely action-based, in a way that manages to capture some but not all weird decision-theoretic scenarios.

In normal bayesianism, you do not have a pseudocausal-causal equivalence. Every ordinary environment is straight-up causal.

Stuart_Armstrong's Shortform

Sounds like a special case of crisp infradistributions (ie, all partial probability distributions have a unique associated crisp infradistribution)

Given some , we can consider the (nonempty) set of probability distributions equal to  where  is defined. This set is convex (clearly, a mixture of two probability distributions which agree with  about the probability of an event will also agree with  about the probability of an event).

Convex (compact) sets of probability distributions = crisp infradistributions.

Introduction To The Infra-Bayesianism Sequence

You're completely right that hypotheses with unconstrained Murphy get ignored because you're doomed no matter what you do, so you might as well optimize for just the other hypotheses where what you do matters. Your "-1,000,000 vs -999,999 is the same sort of problem as 0 vs 1" reasoning is good.

Again, you are making the serious mistake of trying to think about Murphy verbally, rather than thinking of Murphy as the personification of the "inf" part of the  definition of expected value, and writing actual equations.  is the available set of possibilities for a hypothesis. If you really want to, you can think of this as constraints on Murphy, and Murphy picking from available options, but it's highly encouraged to just work with the math.

For mixing hypotheses (several different  sets of possibilities) according to a prior distribution , you can write it as an expectation functional via  (mix the expectation functionals of the component hypotheses according to your prior on hypotheses), or as a set via  (the available possibilities for the mix of hypotheses are all of the form "pick a possibility from each hypothesis, mix them together according to your prior on hypotheses")

This is what I meant by "a constraint on Murphy is picked according to this probability distribution/prior, then Murphy chooses from the available options of the hypothesis they picked", that  set (your mixture of hypotheses according to a prior) corresponds to selecting one of the  sets according to your prior , and then Murphy picking freely from the set .


Using  (and considering our choice of what to do affecting the choice of , we're trying to pick the best function ) we can see that if the prior is composed of a bunch of "do this sequence of actions or bad things happen" hypotheses, the details of what you do sensitively depend on the probability distribution over hypotheses. Just like with AIXI, really.
Informal proof: if  and  (assuming ), then we can see that

and so, the best sequence of actions to do would be the one associated with the "you're doomed if you don't do blahblah action sequence" hypothesis with the highest prior. Much like AIXI does.


Using the same sort of thing, we can also see that if there's a maximally adversarial hypothesis in there somewhere that's just like "you get 0 reward, screw you" no matter what you do (let's say this is psi_0), then we have

And so, that hypothesis drops out of the process of calculating the expected value, for all possible functions/actions. Just do a scale-and-shift, and you might as well be dealing with the prior , which a-priori assumes you aren't in the "screw you, you lose" environment.


Hm, what about if you've just got two hypotheses, one where you're like "my knightian uncertainty scales with the amount of energy in the universe so if there's lots of energy available, things could e really bad, while if there's little energy available, Murphy can't make things bad" () and one where reality behaves pretty much as you'd expect it to(? And your two possible options would be "burn energy freely so Murphy can't use it" (the choice , attaining a worst-case expected utility of  in  and  in ), and "just try to make things good and don't worry about the environment being adversarial" (the choice , attaining 0 utility in , 1 utility in ).

The expected utility of  (burn energy) would be 
And the expected utility of (act normally) would be 

So "act normally" wins if , which can be rearranged as . Ie, you'll act normally if the probability of "things are normal" times the loss from burning energy when things are normal exceeds the probability of "Murphy's malice scales with amount of available energy" times the gain from burning energy in that universe.
So, assuming you assign a high enough probability to "things are normal" in your prior, you'll just act normally. Or, making the simplifying assumption that "burn energy" has similar expected utilities in both cases (ie, ), then it would come down to questions like "is the utility of burning energy closer to the worst-case where Murphy has free reign, or the best-case where I can freely optimize?"
And this is assuming there's just two options, the actual strategy selected would probably be something like "act normally, if it looks like things are going to shit, start burning energy so it can't be used to optimize against me"

Note that, in particular, the hypothesis where the level of attainable badness scales with available energy is very different from the "screw you, you lose" hypothesis, since there are actions you can take that do better and worse in the "level of attainable badness scales with energy in the universe" hypothesis, while the "screw you, you lose" hypothesis just makes you lose. And both of these are very different from a "you lose if you don't take this exact sequence of actions" hypothesis. 

Murphy is not a physical being, it's a personification of an equation, thinking verbally about an actual Murphy doesn't help because you start confusing very different hypotheses, think purely about what the actual set of probability distributions  corresponding to hypothesis  looks like. I can't stress this enough.

Also, remember, the goal is to maximize worst-case expected value, not worst-case value.

 

Introduction To The Infra-Bayesianism Sequence

There's actually an upcoming post going into more detail on what the deal is with pseudocausal and acausal belief functions, among several other things, I can send you a draft if you want. "Belief Functions and Decision Theory" is a post that hasn't held up nearly as well to time as "Basic Inframeasure Theory".

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